Regulation of gut luminal serotonin by commensal microbiota in mice

Tomokazu Hata, Yasunari Asano, Kazufumi Yoshihara, Tae Kimura-Todani, Noriyuki Miyata, Xue Ting Zhang, Shu Takakura, Yuji Aiba, Yasuhiro Koga, Nobuyuki Sudo

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

30 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Gut lumen serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT) contributes to several gastrointestinal functions such as peristaltic reflexes. 5-HT is released from enterochromaffin (EC) cells in response to a number of stimuli, including signals from the gut microbiota. However, the specific mechanism by which the gut microbiota regulates 5-HT levels in the gut lumen has not yet been clarified. Our previous work with gnotobiotic mice showed that free catecholamines can be produced by the deconjugation of conjugated catecholamines; hence, we speculated that deconjugation by bacterial enzymes may be one of the mechanisms whereby gut microbes can produce free 5-HT in the gut lumen. In this study, we tested this hypothesis using germ-free (GF) mice and gnotobiotic mice recolonized with specific pathogen-free (SPF) fecal flora (EX-GF). The 5-HT levels in the lumens of the cecum and colon were significantly lower in the GF mice than in the EX-GF mice. Moreover, these levels were rapidly increased, within only 3 days after exposure to SPF microbiota. The majority of 5-HT was in an unconjugated, free form in the EX-GF mice, whereas approximately 50% of the 5-HT was found in the conjugated form in the GF mice. These results further support the current view that the gut microbiota plays a crucial role in promoting the production of biologically active, free 5-HT. The deconjugation of glucuronide-conjugated 5-HT by bacterial enzymes is likely one of the mechanisms contributing to free 5-HT production in the gut lumen.

元の言語英語
記事番号e0180745
ジャーナルPloS one
12
発行部数7
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 7 2017

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Microbiota
serotonin
Serotonin
digestive system
mice
intestinal microorganisms
Germ-Free Life
Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
catecholamines
Pathogens
Catecholamines
microbiome
Enterochromaffin Cells
Cecum
pathogens
Glucuronides
Enzymes
enzymes
reflexes
cecum

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

これを引用

Regulation of gut luminal serotonin by commensal microbiota in mice. / Hata, Tomokazu; Asano, Yasunari; Yoshihara, Kazufumi; Kimura-Todani, Tae; Miyata, Noriyuki; Zhang, Xue Ting; Takakura, Shu; Aiba, Yuji; Koga, Yasuhiro; Sudo, Nobuyuki.

:: PloS one, 巻 12, 番号 7, e0180745, 07.2017.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Hata, Tomokazu ; Asano, Yasunari ; Yoshihara, Kazufumi ; Kimura-Todani, Tae ; Miyata, Noriyuki ; Zhang, Xue Ting ; Takakura, Shu ; Aiba, Yuji ; Koga, Yasuhiro ; Sudo, Nobuyuki. / Regulation of gut luminal serotonin by commensal microbiota in mice. :: PloS one. 2017 ; 巻 12, 番号 7.
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