Relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee consumption to glycated hemoglobin in Japanese men and women

Takako Maki, Mizuko Ikeda, Makiko Morita, Keizo Ohnaka, Hisaya Kawate, Masahiro Adachi, Ryoichi Takayanagi, Suminori Kono

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

3 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Aims: To investigate the relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee and green tea consumption to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations. Methods: Study subjects were 11,002 Japanese men and women aged 49-76 years in Fukuoka City who participated in the baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases. Those with current or past treatment for diabetes mellitus were excluded. Multivariate-adjusted geometric means of HbA1c and odds ratios of elevated HbA1c (>5.8%) were obtained by analysis of covariance and logistic regression analysis, respectively. Results: Cigarette smoking showed a strong, positive association with HbA1c in men, but not in women. In men, adjusted odds ratio of elevated HbA1c was 1.83 (95% CI 1.25-2.69) for those smoking 20 cigarettes/day or more versus never-smokers. HbA1c concentrations were progressively lower with increasing levels of alcohol intake in both men and women. The adjusted odds ratios of elevated HbA1c for the highest alcohol consumption versus never consumption were 0.62 (95% CI 0.43-0.93) in men and 0.94 (95% CI 0.58-1.52) in women. Coffee consumption showed a suggestive inverse association with HbA1c concentrations in women only, while green tea was not related to HbA1c in either men or women. Conclusions: The present findings add to evidence that cigarette smoking confers deterioration in glucose metabolism and that alcohol intake is protective to glucose intolerance. Further studies are needed on coffee and HbA1c concentrations.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)69-73
ページ数5
ジャーナルDiabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews
4
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 1 2010

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Coffee
Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Smoking
Alcohols
Odds Ratio
Tea
Glucose Intolerance
Alcohol Drinking
Life Style
Diabetes Mellitus
Cohort Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Glucose

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

これを引用

Relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee consumption to glycated hemoglobin in Japanese men and women. / Maki, Takako; Ikeda, Mizuko; Morita, Makiko; Ohnaka, Keizo; Kawate, Hisaya; Adachi, Masahiro; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Kono, Suminori.

:: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews, 巻 4, 番号 2, 01.04.2010, p. 69-73.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Maki, Takako ; Ikeda, Mizuko ; Morita, Makiko ; Ohnaka, Keizo ; Kawate, Hisaya ; Adachi, Masahiro ; Takayanagi, Ryoichi ; Kono, Suminori. / Relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee consumption to glycated hemoglobin in Japanese men and women. :: Diabetes and Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research and Reviews. 2010 ; 巻 4, 番号 2. pp. 69-73.
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abstract = "Aims: To investigate the relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee and green tea consumption to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations. Methods: Study subjects were 11,002 Japanese men and women aged 49-76 years in Fukuoka City who participated in the baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases. Those with current or past treatment for diabetes mellitus were excluded. Multivariate-adjusted geometric means of HbA1c and odds ratios of elevated HbA1c (>5.8{\%}) were obtained by analysis of covariance and logistic regression analysis, respectively. Results: Cigarette smoking showed a strong, positive association with HbA1c in men, but not in women. In men, adjusted odds ratio of elevated HbA1c was 1.83 (95{\%} CI 1.25-2.69) for those smoking 20 cigarettes/day or more versus never-smokers. HbA1c concentrations were progressively lower with increasing levels of alcohol intake in both men and women. The adjusted odds ratios of elevated HbA1c for the highest alcohol consumption versus never consumption were 0.62 (95{\%} CI 0.43-0.93) in men and 0.94 (95{\%} CI 0.58-1.52) in women. Coffee consumption showed a suggestive inverse association with HbA1c concentrations in women only, while green tea was not related to HbA1c in either men or women. Conclusions: The present findings add to evidence that cigarette smoking confers deterioration in glucose metabolism and that alcohol intake is protective to glucose intolerance. Further studies are needed on coffee and HbA1c concentrations.",
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AU - Kawate, Hisaya

AU - Adachi, Masahiro

AU - Takayanagi, Ryoichi

AU - Kono, Suminori

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N2 - Aims: To investigate the relation of cigarette smoking, alcohol use, and coffee and green tea consumption to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) concentrations. Methods: Study subjects were 11,002 Japanese men and women aged 49-76 years in Fukuoka City who participated in the baseline survey of a cohort study on lifestyle-related diseases. Those with current or past treatment for diabetes mellitus were excluded. Multivariate-adjusted geometric means of HbA1c and odds ratios of elevated HbA1c (>5.8%) were obtained by analysis of covariance and logistic regression analysis, respectively. Results: Cigarette smoking showed a strong, positive association with HbA1c in men, but not in women. In men, adjusted odds ratio of elevated HbA1c was 1.83 (95% CI 1.25-2.69) for those smoking 20 cigarettes/day or more versus never-smokers. HbA1c concentrations were progressively lower with increasing levels of alcohol intake in both men and women. The adjusted odds ratios of elevated HbA1c for the highest alcohol consumption versus never consumption were 0.62 (95% CI 0.43-0.93) in men and 0.94 (95% CI 0.58-1.52) in women. Coffee consumption showed a suggestive inverse association with HbA1c concentrations in women only, while green tea was not related to HbA1c in either men or women. Conclusions: The present findings add to evidence that cigarette smoking confers deterioration in glucose metabolism and that alcohol intake is protective to glucose intolerance. Further studies are needed on coffee and HbA1c concentrations.

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