Relationships of variations in the tongue microbiota and pneumonia mortality in nursing home residents

Shinya Kageyama, Toru Takeshita, Michiko Furuta, Mikiko Tomioka, Mikari Asakawa, Shino Suma, Kenji Takeuchi, Yukie Shibata, Yasuyuki Iwasa, Yoshihisa Yamashita

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

11 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: Aspiration of oral debris, containing dense oral bacteria, is a major cause of pneumonia in elderly adults. This study investigated the relationship between tongue microbiota composition and incidence of pneumonia-related deaths, in nursing home residents. Methods: The subjects were assessed for health conditions, including their tongue microbiota, at baseline. We determined tongue microbiota profiles by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and clustering approach. All subjects (n = 173) were followed prospectively for a median of 19 months to assess the incidence of all-cause death, including pneumonia-related death. We evaluated risk estimates of microbiota effects on death using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Tongue microbiota were classified into two community types: type I was dominated by Prevotella and Veillonella species, while type II was dominated by Neisseria and Fusobacterium species. The subjects with type I microbiota exhibited a significantly greater risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-10.39) and pneumonia-related death (aHR = 13.88, 95% CI = 1.64-117.21), than those with type II microbiota. There was no significant association between microbiota type and other-cause death. Conclusions: The tongue microbiota type was significantly associated with an increased mortality risk from pneumonia in nursing home residents.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1097-1102
ページ数6
ジャーナルJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
73
発行部数8
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2018

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Microbiota
Nursing Homes
Tongue
Pneumonia
Mortality
Cause of Death
Veillonella
Fusobacterium
Prevotella
Confidence Intervals
16S Ribosomal RNA
RNA Sequence Analysis
Neisseria
Incidence
rRNA Genes
Cluster Analysis
Regression Analysis
Bacteria
Health

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ageing
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

これを引用

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title = "Relationships of variations in the tongue microbiota and pneumonia mortality in nursing home residents",
abstract = "Background: Aspiration of oral debris, containing dense oral bacteria, is a major cause of pneumonia in elderly adults. This study investigated the relationship between tongue microbiota composition and incidence of pneumonia-related deaths, in nursing home residents. Methods: The subjects were assessed for health conditions, including their tongue microbiota, at baseline. We determined tongue microbiota profiles by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and clustering approach. All subjects (n = 173) were followed prospectively for a median of 19 months to assess the incidence of all-cause death, including pneumonia-related death. We evaluated risk estimates of microbiota effects on death using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Tongue microbiota were classified into two community types: type I was dominated by Prevotella and Veillonella species, while type II was dominated by Neisseria and Fusobacterium species. The subjects with type I microbiota exhibited a significantly greater risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.79, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-10.39) and pneumonia-related death (aHR = 13.88, 95{\%} CI = 1.64-117.21), than those with type II microbiota. There was no significant association between microbiota type and other-cause death. Conclusions: The tongue microbiota type was significantly associated with an increased mortality risk from pneumonia in nursing home residents.",
author = "Shinya Kageyama and Toru Takeshita and Michiko Furuta and Mikiko Tomioka and Mikari Asakawa and Shino Suma and Kenji Takeuchi and Yukie Shibata and Yasuyuki Iwasa and Yoshihisa Yamashita",
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T1 - Relationships of variations in the tongue microbiota and pneumonia mortality in nursing home residents

AU - Kageyama, Shinya

AU - Takeshita, Toru

AU - Furuta, Michiko

AU - Tomioka, Mikiko

AU - Asakawa, Mikari

AU - Suma, Shino

AU - Takeuchi, Kenji

AU - Shibata, Yukie

AU - Iwasa, Yasuyuki

AU - Yamashita, Yoshihisa

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Aspiration of oral debris, containing dense oral bacteria, is a major cause of pneumonia in elderly adults. This study investigated the relationship between tongue microbiota composition and incidence of pneumonia-related deaths, in nursing home residents. Methods: The subjects were assessed for health conditions, including their tongue microbiota, at baseline. We determined tongue microbiota profiles by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and clustering approach. All subjects (n = 173) were followed prospectively for a median of 19 months to assess the incidence of all-cause death, including pneumonia-related death. We evaluated risk estimates of microbiota effects on death using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Tongue microbiota were classified into two community types: type I was dominated by Prevotella and Veillonella species, while type II was dominated by Neisseria and Fusobacterium species. The subjects with type I microbiota exhibited a significantly greater risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-10.39) and pneumonia-related death (aHR = 13.88, 95% CI = 1.64-117.21), than those with type II microbiota. There was no significant association between microbiota type and other-cause death. Conclusions: The tongue microbiota type was significantly associated with an increased mortality risk from pneumonia in nursing home residents.

AB - Background: Aspiration of oral debris, containing dense oral bacteria, is a major cause of pneumonia in elderly adults. This study investigated the relationship between tongue microbiota composition and incidence of pneumonia-related deaths, in nursing home residents. Methods: The subjects were assessed for health conditions, including their tongue microbiota, at baseline. We determined tongue microbiota profiles by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing and clustering approach. All subjects (n = 173) were followed prospectively for a median of 19 months to assess the incidence of all-cause death, including pneumonia-related death. We evaluated risk estimates of microbiota effects on death using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results: Tongue microbiota were classified into two community types: type I was dominated by Prevotella and Veillonella species, while type II was dominated by Neisseria and Fusobacterium species. The subjects with type I microbiota exhibited a significantly greater risk of all-cause death (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 3.79, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.38-10.39) and pneumonia-related death (aHR = 13.88, 95% CI = 1.64-117.21), than those with type II microbiota. There was no significant association between microbiota type and other-cause death. Conclusions: The tongue microbiota type was significantly associated with an increased mortality risk from pneumonia in nursing home residents.

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