Sexual conflict and the gender load: Correlated evolution between population fitness and sexual dimorphism in seed beetles

Göran Arnqvist, Midori Tuda

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

36 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Although males and females share much of the same genome, selection is often distinct in the two sexes. Sexually antagonistic loci will in theory cause a gender load in populations, because sex-specific selection on a given trait in one sex will compromise the adaptive evolution of the same trait in the other sex. However, it is currently not clear whether such intralocus sexual conflict (ISC) represents a transient evolutionary state, where conflict is rapidly resolved by the evolution of sexual dimorphism (SD), or whether it is a more chronic impediment to adaptation. All else being equal, ISC should manifest itself as correlated evolution between population fitness and SD in traits expressed in both sexes. However, comparative tests of this prediction are problematic and have been unfeasible. Here, we assess the effects of ISC by comparing fitness and SD across distinct laboratory populations of seed beetles that should be well adapted to a shared environment. We show that SD in juvenile development time, a key life-history trait with a history of sexually antagonistic selection in this model system, is positively related to fitness. This effect is due to a correlated evolution between population fitness and development time that is positive in females but negative in males. Loosening the genetic bind between the sexes has evidently allowed the sexes to approach their distinct adaptive peaks.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1345-1352
ページ数8
ジャーナルProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
277
発行部数1686
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 5 7 2010

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sexual conflict
Bruchidae
Beetles
sexual dimorphism
Sex Characteristics
Seed
Seeds
beetle
gender
fitness
Genes
seed
Population
Sex Preselection
life history trait
genome
history
prediction
Genome
life history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

これを引用

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