Short- and Long-term Effects of Dialysate Calcium Concentrations on Mineral and Bone Metabolism in Hemodialysis Patients: The K4 Study

Teppei Sakoh, Masatomo Taniguchi, Shunsuke Yamada, Shotaro Ohnaka, Hokuto Arase, Masanori Tokumoto, Taihei Yanagida, Koji Mitsuiki, Hideki Hirakata, Toshiaki Nakano, Takanari Kitazono, Kazuhiko Tsuruya

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

1 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Rationale & Objective: The short- and long-term impact of conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 2.5 or 3.0 mEq/L to 2.75 mEq/L on mineral and bone metabolism remains unknown in hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Nonrandomized intervention study. Setting & Population: 12 hemodialysis patients treated at baseline with a 2.5-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration and another 12 hemodialysis patients treated with a 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Intervention: Use of 2.75-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Outcomes: Changes in intradialytic calcium and phosphate clearance and changes in predialysis and intradialytic serum and ionized mineral and biochemical parameters over the 24 weeks following dialysate calcium conversion. Results: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L increased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels, whereas conversion of dialysate calcium from 3.0 to 2.75 mEq/L decreased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels. Dialysate calcium concentration conversion did not affect intradialytic serum parathyroid hormone level, intradialytic phosphate elimination, or predialysis serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Intradialytic calcium influx was determined by dialysate calcium concentration and predialysis serum calcium levels, whereas intradialytic phosphate elimination was determined by predialysis serum phosphate levels. Limitations: Small sample size and no control groups treated with 2.5- and 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentrations during the 24 weeks of the observation period. Conclusions: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 3.0 or 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L results in expected changes in calcium loading based on predialysis calcium concentration. The dialysate calcium concentration should be personalized based on clinical factors. Funding: None. Trial Registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network, www.umin.ac.jp/english/, R000040105, UMIN000035184.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)296-306
ページ数11
ジャーナルKidney Medicine
1
発行部数5
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 9 1 2019

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Dialysis Solutions
Minerals
Renal Dialysis
Calcium
Bone and Bones
Serum
Phosphates
Parathyroid Hormone
Information Services

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Nephrology

これを引用

Short- and Long-term Effects of Dialysate Calcium Concentrations on Mineral and Bone Metabolism in Hemodialysis Patients : The K4 Study. / Sakoh, Teppei; Taniguchi, Masatomo; Yamada, Shunsuke; Ohnaka, Shotaro; Arase, Hokuto; Tokumoto, Masanori; Yanagida, Taihei; Mitsuiki, Koji; Hirakata, Hideki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Kitazono, Takanari; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko.

:: Kidney Medicine, 巻 1, 番号 5, 01.09.2019, p. 296-306.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Sakoh, T, Taniguchi, M, Yamada, S, Ohnaka, S, Arase, H, Tokumoto, M, Yanagida, T, Mitsuiki, K, Hirakata, H, Nakano, T, Kitazono, T & Tsuruya, K 2019, 'Short- and Long-term Effects of Dialysate Calcium Concentrations on Mineral and Bone Metabolism in Hemodialysis Patients: The K4 Study', Kidney Medicine, 巻. 1, 番号 5, pp. 296-306. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.xkme.2019.08.002
Sakoh, Teppei ; Taniguchi, Masatomo ; Yamada, Shunsuke ; Ohnaka, Shotaro ; Arase, Hokuto ; Tokumoto, Masanori ; Yanagida, Taihei ; Mitsuiki, Koji ; Hirakata, Hideki ; Nakano, Toshiaki ; Kitazono, Takanari ; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko. / Short- and Long-term Effects of Dialysate Calcium Concentrations on Mineral and Bone Metabolism in Hemodialysis Patients : The K4 Study. :: Kidney Medicine. 2019 ; 巻 1, 番号 5. pp. 296-306.
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abstract = "Rationale & Objective: The short- and long-term impact of conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 2.5 or 3.0 mEq/L to 2.75 mEq/L on mineral and bone metabolism remains unknown in hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Nonrandomized intervention study. Setting & Population: 12 hemodialysis patients treated at baseline with a 2.5-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration and another 12 hemodialysis patients treated with a 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Intervention: Use of 2.75-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Outcomes: Changes in intradialytic calcium and phosphate clearance and changes in predialysis and intradialytic serum and ionized mineral and biochemical parameters over the 24 weeks following dialysate calcium conversion. Results: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L increased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels, whereas conversion of dialysate calcium from 3.0 to 2.75 mEq/L decreased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels. Dialysate calcium concentration conversion did not affect intradialytic serum parathyroid hormone level, intradialytic phosphate elimination, or predialysis serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Intradialytic calcium influx was determined by dialysate calcium concentration and predialysis serum calcium levels, whereas intradialytic phosphate elimination was determined by predialysis serum phosphate levels. Limitations: Small sample size and no control groups treated with 2.5- and 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentrations during the 24 weeks of the observation period. Conclusions: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 3.0 or 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L results in expected changes in calcium loading based on predialysis calcium concentration. The dialysate calcium concentration should be personalized based on clinical factors. Funding: None. Trial Registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network, www.umin.ac.jp/english/, R000040105, UMIN000035184.",
author = "Teppei Sakoh and Masatomo Taniguchi and Shunsuke Yamada and Shotaro Ohnaka and Hokuto Arase and Masanori Tokumoto and Taihei Yanagida and Koji Mitsuiki and Hideki Hirakata and Toshiaki Nakano and Takanari Kitazono and Kazuhiko Tsuruya",
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AU - Taniguchi, Masatomo

AU - Yamada, Shunsuke

AU - Ohnaka, Shotaro

AU - Arase, Hokuto

AU - Tokumoto, Masanori

AU - Yanagida, Taihei

AU - Mitsuiki, Koji

AU - Hirakata, Hideki

AU - Nakano, Toshiaki

AU - Kitazono, Takanari

AU - Tsuruya, Kazuhiko

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N2 - Rationale & Objective: The short- and long-term impact of conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 2.5 or 3.0 mEq/L to 2.75 mEq/L on mineral and bone metabolism remains unknown in hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Nonrandomized intervention study. Setting & Population: 12 hemodialysis patients treated at baseline with a 2.5-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration and another 12 hemodialysis patients treated with a 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Intervention: Use of 2.75-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Outcomes: Changes in intradialytic calcium and phosphate clearance and changes in predialysis and intradialytic serum and ionized mineral and biochemical parameters over the 24 weeks following dialysate calcium conversion. Results: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L increased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels, whereas conversion of dialysate calcium from 3.0 to 2.75 mEq/L decreased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels. Dialysate calcium concentration conversion did not affect intradialytic serum parathyroid hormone level, intradialytic phosphate elimination, or predialysis serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Intradialytic calcium influx was determined by dialysate calcium concentration and predialysis serum calcium levels, whereas intradialytic phosphate elimination was determined by predialysis serum phosphate levels. Limitations: Small sample size and no control groups treated with 2.5- and 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentrations during the 24 weeks of the observation period. Conclusions: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 3.0 or 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L results in expected changes in calcium loading based on predialysis calcium concentration. The dialysate calcium concentration should be personalized based on clinical factors. Funding: None. Trial Registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network, www.umin.ac.jp/english/, R000040105, UMIN000035184.

AB - Rationale & Objective: The short- and long-term impact of conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 2.5 or 3.0 mEq/L to 2.75 mEq/L on mineral and bone metabolism remains unknown in hemodialysis patients. Study Design: Nonrandomized intervention study. Setting & Population: 12 hemodialysis patients treated at baseline with a 2.5-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration and another 12 hemodialysis patients treated with a 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Intervention: Use of 2.75-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentration. Outcomes: Changes in intradialytic calcium and phosphate clearance and changes in predialysis and intradialytic serum and ionized mineral and biochemical parameters over the 24 weeks following dialysate calcium conversion. Results: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L increased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels, whereas conversion of dialysate calcium from 3.0 to 2.75 mEq/L decreased intradialytic calcium loading and serum total and ionized calcium levels. Dialysate calcium concentration conversion did not affect intradialytic serum parathyroid hormone level, intradialytic phosphate elimination, or predialysis serum calcium, phosphate, parathyroid hormone, and fibroblast growth factor 23 levels. Intradialytic calcium influx was determined by dialysate calcium concentration and predialysis serum calcium levels, whereas intradialytic phosphate elimination was determined by predialysis serum phosphate levels. Limitations: Small sample size and no control groups treated with 2.5- and 3.0-mEq/L dialysate calcium concentrations during the 24 weeks of the observation period. Conclusions: Conversion of dialysate calcium concentration from either 3.0 or 2.5 to 2.75 mEq/L results in expected changes in calcium loading based on predialysis calcium concentration. The dialysate calcium concentration should be personalized based on clinical factors. Funding: None. Trial Registration: University Hospital Medical Information Network, www.umin.ac.jp/english/, R000040105, UMIN000035184.

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