Short-term and persistent impacts on behaviors related to locomotion, anxiety, and startle responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) induced by acute, sublethal exposure to chlorpyrifos

Xuchun Qiu, Sayaka Nomichi, Kun Chen, Masato Honda, Ikjoon Kang, Yohei Shimasaki, Yuji Oshima

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

3 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Although most exposures to chlorpyrifos (CPF) in natural flowing waters are brief and episodic, there have been a few reports of the persistence of abnormal fish behaviors caused by such acute exposure. The present study focused on the behavioral and biochemical responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) to acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, as well as the persistence of the effects during a 3-week recovery test in CPF-free water. The medaka became hyperactive and exhibited an elevated anxiety state after a 4-day exposure to 0.024 mg/L of CPF, but they recovered from these abnormal behavioral responses within 7 days of recovery treatment. In contrast, persistent impacts on some startle responses to a sudden stimulation (induced by a ball drop) were observed in medaka exposed to CPF. The reaction latency did not change immediately after the 4-day exposure, but was significantly prolonged by as much as 21 days after the termination of exposure. The post-stimulus swimming distance within 5 s significantly decreased on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it significantly increased after 7 days of recovery treatment. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brains of medaka was significantly inhibited on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it returned to 80% and 110% of that in control fish on days 7 and 21 of the recovery period, respectively. However, AChE activities in the eyes of exposed medaka were persistently inhibited and declined to 33%, 71%, and 72% of that in control fish on days 0 (immediately after the 4-day exposure), 7, and 21 of recovery, respectively. Correlation analysis suggested that the changes of AChE activities in the brains of medaka may underlie some of the observed acute behavioral changes, and the changes of AChE activities in the eyes may contribute to the persistence of the abnormalities in the reaction latency of the startle response. Our findings suggest that medaka need a long time to recover from acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, and the persistence of the behavioral abnormalities might affect their fitness in natural habitats.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)148-154
ページ数7
ジャーナルAquatic Toxicology
192
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2017

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Startle Reflex
Oryzias
Chlorpyrifos
Oryzias latipes
chlorpyrifos
locomotion
Locomotion
anxiety
Anxiety
acetylcholinesterase
Acetylcholinesterase
persistence
Fishes
brain
abnormal behavior
abnormality
acute exposure
fish behavior
fish
exposure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aquatic Science
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

これを引用

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title = "Short-term and persistent impacts on behaviors related to locomotion, anxiety, and startle responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) induced by acute, sublethal exposure to chlorpyrifos",
abstract = "Although most exposures to chlorpyrifos (CPF) in natural flowing waters are brief and episodic, there have been a few reports of the persistence of abnormal fish behaviors caused by such acute exposure. The present study focused on the behavioral and biochemical responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) to acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, as well as the persistence of the effects during a 3-week recovery test in CPF-free water. The medaka became hyperactive and exhibited an elevated anxiety state after a 4-day exposure to 0.024 mg/L of CPF, but they recovered from these abnormal behavioral responses within 7 days of recovery treatment. In contrast, persistent impacts on some startle responses to a sudden stimulation (induced by a ball drop) were observed in medaka exposed to CPF. The reaction latency did not change immediately after the 4-day exposure, but was significantly prolonged by as much as 21 days after the termination of exposure. The post-stimulus swimming distance within 5 s significantly decreased on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it significantly increased after 7 days of recovery treatment. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brains of medaka was significantly inhibited on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it returned to 80{\%} and 110{\%} of that in control fish on days 7 and 21 of the recovery period, respectively. However, AChE activities in the eyes of exposed medaka were persistently inhibited and declined to 33{\%}, 71{\%}, and 72{\%} of that in control fish on days 0 (immediately after the 4-day exposure), 7, and 21 of recovery, respectively. Correlation analysis suggested that the changes of AChE activities in the brains of medaka may underlie some of the observed acute behavioral changes, and the changes of AChE activities in the eyes may contribute to the persistence of the abnormalities in the reaction latency of the startle response. Our findings suggest that medaka need a long time to recover from acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, and the persistence of the behavioral abnormalities might affect their fitness in natural habitats.",
author = "Xuchun Qiu and Sayaka Nomichi and Kun Chen and Masato Honda and Ikjoon Kang and Yohei Shimasaki and Yuji Oshima",
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T1 - Short-term and persistent impacts on behaviors related to locomotion, anxiety, and startle responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) induced by acute, sublethal exposure to chlorpyrifos

AU - Qiu, Xuchun

AU - Nomichi, Sayaka

AU - Chen, Kun

AU - Honda, Masato

AU - Kang, Ikjoon

AU - Shimasaki, Yohei

AU - Oshima, Yuji

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Although most exposures to chlorpyrifos (CPF) in natural flowing waters are brief and episodic, there have been a few reports of the persistence of abnormal fish behaviors caused by such acute exposure. The present study focused on the behavioral and biochemical responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) to acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, as well as the persistence of the effects during a 3-week recovery test in CPF-free water. The medaka became hyperactive and exhibited an elevated anxiety state after a 4-day exposure to 0.024 mg/L of CPF, but they recovered from these abnormal behavioral responses within 7 days of recovery treatment. In contrast, persistent impacts on some startle responses to a sudden stimulation (induced by a ball drop) were observed in medaka exposed to CPF. The reaction latency did not change immediately after the 4-day exposure, but was significantly prolonged by as much as 21 days after the termination of exposure. The post-stimulus swimming distance within 5 s significantly decreased on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it significantly increased after 7 days of recovery treatment. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brains of medaka was significantly inhibited on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it returned to 80% and 110% of that in control fish on days 7 and 21 of the recovery period, respectively. However, AChE activities in the eyes of exposed medaka were persistently inhibited and declined to 33%, 71%, and 72% of that in control fish on days 0 (immediately after the 4-day exposure), 7, and 21 of recovery, respectively. Correlation analysis suggested that the changes of AChE activities in the brains of medaka may underlie some of the observed acute behavioral changes, and the changes of AChE activities in the eyes may contribute to the persistence of the abnormalities in the reaction latency of the startle response. Our findings suggest that medaka need a long time to recover from acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, and the persistence of the behavioral abnormalities might affect their fitness in natural habitats.

AB - Although most exposures to chlorpyrifos (CPF) in natural flowing waters are brief and episodic, there have been a few reports of the persistence of abnormal fish behaviors caused by such acute exposure. The present study focused on the behavioral and biochemical responses of Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) to acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, as well as the persistence of the effects during a 3-week recovery test in CPF-free water. The medaka became hyperactive and exhibited an elevated anxiety state after a 4-day exposure to 0.024 mg/L of CPF, but they recovered from these abnormal behavioral responses within 7 days of recovery treatment. In contrast, persistent impacts on some startle responses to a sudden stimulation (induced by a ball drop) were observed in medaka exposed to CPF. The reaction latency did not change immediately after the 4-day exposure, but was significantly prolonged by as much as 21 days after the termination of exposure. The post-stimulus swimming distance within 5 s significantly decreased on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it significantly increased after 7 days of recovery treatment. The activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brains of medaka was significantly inhibited on the day immediately after the 4-day exposure, but it returned to 80% and 110% of that in control fish on days 7 and 21 of the recovery period, respectively. However, AChE activities in the eyes of exposed medaka were persistently inhibited and declined to 33%, 71%, and 72% of that in control fish on days 0 (immediately after the 4-day exposure), 7, and 21 of recovery, respectively. Correlation analysis suggested that the changes of AChE activities in the brains of medaka may underlie some of the observed acute behavioral changes, and the changes of AChE activities in the eyes may contribute to the persistence of the abnormalities in the reaction latency of the startle response. Our findings suggest that medaka need a long time to recover from acute, sublethal exposure to CPF, and the persistence of the behavioral abnormalities might affect their fitness in natural habitats.

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