Significance of spread through air spaces in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas undergoing limited resection

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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Background: In early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, spread through air spaces (STAS) are reported to be a prognostic factor in patients who have undergone sublobar resection, but not lobectomy. In contrast, reports have also shown that STAS is significantly associated with poor survival outcomes after lobectomy, but not after limited resection. Thus, the prognostic impact of STAS differs according to published reports. Methods: A total of 82 patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas who underwent limited resection and whose STAS status could be examined were enrolled in this retrospective study. We evaluated the association between STAS and clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survival. Results: Among 82 patients, 31 (37.8%) were positive for STAS, while 51 (62.2%) were negative. STAS was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (P < 0.01), lower histological differentiation (P = 0.01), and the presence of pleural invasion (P = 0.01). Patients with STAS had significantly shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those without STAS (P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). According to multivariate analysis, positivity for STAS was an independent prognostic parameter for RFS (P < 0.01), but not OS (P = 0.45). Three patients who developed surgical margin recurrence and one patient who developed distant recurrence were all positive for STAS. Conclusions: STAS was predictive of poor postoperative survival in patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas treated with limited resection and was associated with surgical margin recurrence.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1255-1261
ページ数7
ジャーナルThoracic Cancer
9
発行部数10
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 10 1 2018

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Air
Survival
Recurrence
Adenocarcinoma of lung
Adenocarcinoma
Multivariate Analysis
Retrospective Studies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

これを引用

Significance of spread through air spaces in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas undergoing limited resection. / Toyokawa, Gouji; Yamada, Yuichi; Tagawa, Tetsuzo; Oda, Yoshinao.

:: Thoracic Cancer, 巻 9, 番号 10, 01.10.2018, p. 1255-1261.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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title = "Significance of spread through air spaces in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas undergoing limited resection",
abstract = "Background: In early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, spread through air spaces (STAS) are reported to be a prognostic factor in patients who have undergone sublobar resection, but not lobectomy. In contrast, reports have also shown that STAS is significantly associated with poor survival outcomes after lobectomy, but not after limited resection. Thus, the prognostic impact of STAS differs according to published reports. Methods: A total of 82 patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas who underwent limited resection and whose STAS status could be examined were enrolled in this retrospective study. We evaluated the association between STAS and clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survival. Results: Among 82 patients, 31 (37.8{\%}) were positive for STAS, while 51 (62.2{\%}) were negative. STAS was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (P < 0.01), lower histological differentiation (P = 0.01), and the presence of pleural invasion (P = 0.01). Patients with STAS had significantly shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those without STAS (P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). According to multivariate analysis, positivity for STAS was an independent prognostic parameter for RFS (P < 0.01), but not OS (P = 0.45). Three patients who developed surgical margin recurrence and one patient who developed distant recurrence were all positive for STAS. Conclusions: STAS was predictive of poor postoperative survival in patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas treated with limited resection and was associated with surgical margin recurrence.",
author = "Gouji Toyokawa and Yuichi Yamada and Tetsuzo Tagawa and Yoshinao Oda",
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T1 - Significance of spread through air spaces in early-stage lung adenocarcinomas undergoing limited resection

AU - Toyokawa, Gouji

AU - Yamada, Yuichi

AU - Tagawa, Tetsuzo

AU - Oda, Yoshinao

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Background: In early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, spread through air spaces (STAS) are reported to be a prognostic factor in patients who have undergone sublobar resection, but not lobectomy. In contrast, reports have also shown that STAS is significantly associated with poor survival outcomes after lobectomy, but not after limited resection. Thus, the prognostic impact of STAS differs according to published reports. Methods: A total of 82 patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas who underwent limited resection and whose STAS status could be examined were enrolled in this retrospective study. We evaluated the association between STAS and clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survival. Results: Among 82 patients, 31 (37.8%) were positive for STAS, while 51 (62.2%) were negative. STAS was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (P < 0.01), lower histological differentiation (P = 0.01), and the presence of pleural invasion (P = 0.01). Patients with STAS had significantly shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those without STAS (P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). According to multivariate analysis, positivity for STAS was an independent prognostic parameter for RFS (P < 0.01), but not OS (P = 0.45). Three patients who developed surgical margin recurrence and one patient who developed distant recurrence were all positive for STAS. Conclusions: STAS was predictive of poor postoperative survival in patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas treated with limited resection and was associated with surgical margin recurrence.

AB - Background: In early-stage lung adenocarcinomas, spread through air spaces (STAS) are reported to be a prognostic factor in patients who have undergone sublobar resection, but not lobectomy. In contrast, reports have also shown that STAS is significantly associated with poor survival outcomes after lobectomy, but not after limited resection. Thus, the prognostic impact of STAS differs according to published reports. Methods: A total of 82 patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas who underwent limited resection and whose STAS status could be examined were enrolled in this retrospective study. We evaluated the association between STAS and clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative survival. Results: Among 82 patients, 31 (37.8%) were positive for STAS, while 51 (62.2%) were negative. STAS was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage (P < 0.01), lower histological differentiation (P = 0.01), and the presence of pleural invasion (P = 0.01). Patients with STAS had significantly shorter recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) than those without STAS (P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). According to multivariate analysis, positivity for STAS was an independent prognostic parameter for RFS (P < 0.01), but not OS (P = 0.45). Three patients who developed surgical margin recurrence and one patient who developed distant recurrence were all positive for STAS. Conclusions: STAS was predictive of poor postoperative survival in patients with early-stage adenocarcinomas treated with limited resection and was associated with surgical margin recurrence.

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