Socioeconomic inequalities in oral health among middle-aged and elderly Japanese: NIPPON DATA2010

NIPPON DATA2010 Research Group

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

3 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Background: Most studies on socioeconomic inequalities in oral health have not considered the effects of behavioral and biological factors and age differences. Furthermore, the nationwide status of inequalities remains unclear in Japan. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,089 residents aged ≥40 years throughout Japan. The lowest quartile of the number of remaining teeth for each 10-year age category was defined as poor oral health. Behavioral and biological factors included smoking status, obesity, diabetes mellitus, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of dental devices. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations of educational attainment and equivalent household expenditure (EHE) with oral health, and stratified analyses by age category were also conducted (40–64 years and ≥65 years). Results: Lower education and lower EHE were significantly associated with an increased risk of poor oral health after adjusting for age, sex, employment status, marital and living statuses, and EHE=education; the odds ratio for junior high school education compared with ≥college education was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.49), and the odds ratio of the lowest compared with the highest EHE quartile was 1.91 (95% CI, 1.43–2.56). Further adjustments for behavioral and biological factors attenuated but did not eliminate these associations. EHE was significantly associated with oral health among elderly adults only, with a significant interaction by age category. Conclusions: Those with a lower education and those with lower EHE had a significantly higher risk of poor oral health, even after adjustments for behavioral and biological factors.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)S59-S65
ジャーナルJournal of epidemiology
28
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2018

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Oral Health
Health Expenditures
Biological Factors
Education
Tooth
Japan
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Marital Status
C-Reactive Protein
Diabetes Mellitus
Obesity
Logistic Models
Smoking
Regression Analysis
Equipment and Supplies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology

これを引用

Socioeconomic inequalities in oral health among middle-aged and elderly Japanese : NIPPON DATA2010. / NIPPON DATA2010 Research Group.

:: Journal of epidemiology, 巻 28, 01.01.2018, p. S59-S65.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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title = "Socioeconomic inequalities in oral health among middle-aged and elderly Japanese: NIPPON DATA2010",
abstract = "Background: Most studies on socioeconomic inequalities in oral health have not considered the effects of behavioral and biological factors and age differences. Furthermore, the nationwide status of inequalities remains unclear in Japan. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,089 residents aged ≥40 years throughout Japan. The lowest quartile of the number of remaining teeth for each 10-year age category was defined as poor oral health. Behavioral and biological factors included smoking status, obesity, diabetes mellitus, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of dental devices. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations of educational attainment and equivalent household expenditure (EHE) with oral health, and stratified analyses by age category were also conducted (40–64 years and ≥65 years). Results: Lower education and lower EHE were significantly associated with an increased risk of poor oral health after adjusting for age, sex, employment status, marital and living statuses, and EHE=education; the odds ratio for junior high school education compared with ≥college education was 1.84 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.49), and the odds ratio of the lowest compared with the highest EHE quartile was 1.91 (95{\%} CI, 1.43–2.56). Further adjustments for behavioral and biological factors attenuated but did not eliminate these associations. EHE was significantly associated with oral health among elderly adults only, with a significant interaction by age category. Conclusions: Those with a lower education and those with lower EHE had a significantly higher risk of poor oral health, even after adjustments for behavioral and biological factors.",
author = "{NIPPON DATA2010 Research Group} and Keiko Murakami and Takayoshi Ohkubo and Mieko Nakamura and Toshiharu Ninomiya and Toshiyuki Ojima and Kayoko Shirai and Tomomi Nagahata and Aya Kadota and Nagako Okuda and Nobuo Nishi and Tomonori Okamura and Hirotsugu Ueshima and Akira Okayama and Katsuyuki Miura",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.2188/jea.JE20170247",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Socioeconomic inequalities in oral health among middle-aged and elderly Japanese

T2 - NIPPON DATA2010

AU - NIPPON DATA2010 Research Group

AU - Murakami, Keiko

AU - Ohkubo, Takayoshi

AU - Nakamura, Mieko

AU - Ninomiya, Toshiharu

AU - Ojima, Toshiyuki

AU - Shirai, Kayoko

AU - Nagahata, Tomomi

AU - Kadota, Aya

AU - Okuda, Nagako

AU - Nishi, Nobuo

AU - Okamura, Tomonori

AU - Ueshima, Hirotsugu

AU - Okayama, Akira

AU - Miura, Katsuyuki

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Most studies on socioeconomic inequalities in oral health have not considered the effects of behavioral and biological factors and age differences. Furthermore, the nationwide status of inequalities remains unclear in Japan. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,089 residents aged ≥40 years throughout Japan. The lowest quartile of the number of remaining teeth for each 10-year age category was defined as poor oral health. Behavioral and biological factors included smoking status, obesity, diabetes mellitus, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of dental devices. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations of educational attainment and equivalent household expenditure (EHE) with oral health, and stratified analyses by age category were also conducted (40–64 years and ≥65 years). Results: Lower education and lower EHE were significantly associated with an increased risk of poor oral health after adjusting for age, sex, employment status, marital and living statuses, and EHE=education; the odds ratio for junior high school education compared with ≥college education was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.49), and the odds ratio of the lowest compared with the highest EHE quartile was 1.91 (95% CI, 1.43–2.56). Further adjustments for behavioral and biological factors attenuated but did not eliminate these associations. EHE was significantly associated with oral health among elderly adults only, with a significant interaction by age category. Conclusions: Those with a lower education and those with lower EHE had a significantly higher risk of poor oral health, even after adjustments for behavioral and biological factors.

AB - Background: Most studies on socioeconomic inequalities in oral health have not considered the effects of behavioral and biological factors and age differences. Furthermore, the nationwide status of inequalities remains unclear in Japan. Methods: We analyzed data from 2,089 residents aged ≥40 years throughout Japan. The lowest quartile of the number of remaining teeth for each 10-year age category was defined as poor oral health. Behavioral and biological factors included smoking status, obesity, diabetes mellitus, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and the use of dental devices. Multiple logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the associations of educational attainment and equivalent household expenditure (EHE) with oral health, and stratified analyses by age category were also conducted (40–64 years and ≥65 years). Results: Lower education and lower EHE were significantly associated with an increased risk of poor oral health after adjusting for age, sex, employment status, marital and living statuses, and EHE=education; the odds ratio for junior high school education compared with ≥college education was 1.84 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36–2.49), and the odds ratio of the lowest compared with the highest EHE quartile was 1.91 (95% CI, 1.43–2.56). Further adjustments for behavioral and biological factors attenuated but did not eliminate these associations. EHE was significantly associated with oral health among elderly adults only, with a significant interaction by age category. Conclusions: Those with a lower education and those with lower EHE had a significantly higher risk of poor oral health, even after adjustments for behavioral and biological factors.

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U2 - 10.2188/jea.JE20170247

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JO - Journal of Epidemiology

JF - Journal of Epidemiology

SN - 0917-5040

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