Spatially resolved metabolic distribution for unraveling the physiological change and responses in tomato fruit using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI)

Junya Nakamura, Tomomi Morikawa-Ichinose, Yoshinori Fujimura, Eisuke Hayakawa, Katsutoshi Takahashi, Takanori Ishii, Daisuke Miura, Hiroyuki Wariishi

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

10 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Information on spatiotemporal metabolic behavior is indispensable for a precise understanding of physiological changes and responses, including those of ripening processes and wounding stress, in fruit, but such information is still limited. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of metabolites within tissue sections of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI) technique combined with a matrix sublimation/recrystallization method. This technique elucidated the unique distribution patterns of more than 30 metabolite-derived ions, including primary and secondary metabolites, simultaneously. To investigate spatiotemporal metabolic alterations during physiological changes at the whole-tissue level, MALDI–MSI was performed using the different ripening phenotypes of mature green and mature red tomato fruits. Although apparent alterations in the localization and intensity of many detected metabolites were not observed between the two tomatoes, the amounts of glutamate and adenosine monophosphate, umami compounds, increased in both mesocarp and locule regions during the ripening process. In contrast, malate, a sour compound, decreased in both regions. MALDI–MSI was also applied to evaluate more local metabolic responses to wounding stress. Accumulations of a glycoalkaloid, tomatine, and a low level of its glycosylated metabolite, esculeoside A, were found in the wound region where cell death had been induced. Their inverse levels were observed in non-wounded regions. Furthermore, the amounts of both compounds differed in the developmental stages. Thus, our MALDI–MSI technique increased the understanding of the physiological changes and responses of tomato fruit through the determination of spatiotemporally resolved metabolic alterations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)1697-1706
ページ数10
ジャーナルAnalytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry
409
発行部数6
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2017

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Lycopersicon esculentum
Metabolites
Fruits
Spectrometry
Fruit
Desorption
Spectrum Analysis
Lasers
Imaging techniques
Tomatine
Sublimation
Tissue
Cell death
Adenosine Monophosphate
Spatial distribution
Glutamic Acid
Cell Death
Crystallization
Ions
Phenotype

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Analytical Chemistry
  • Biochemistry

これを引用

Spatially resolved metabolic distribution for unraveling the physiological change and responses in tomato fruit using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI). / Nakamura, Junya; Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi; Fujimura, Yoshinori; Hayakawa, Eisuke; Takahashi, Katsutoshi; Ishii, Takanori; Miura, Daisuke; Wariishi, Hiroyuki.

:: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 巻 409, 番号 6, 01.01.2017, p. 1697-1706.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Nakamura, Junya ; Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi ; Fujimura, Yoshinori ; Hayakawa, Eisuke ; Takahashi, Katsutoshi ; Ishii, Takanori ; Miura, Daisuke ; Wariishi, Hiroyuki. / Spatially resolved metabolic distribution for unraveling the physiological change and responses in tomato fruit using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI). :: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry. 2017 ; 巻 409, 番号 6. pp. 1697-1706.
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abstract = "Information on spatiotemporal metabolic behavior is indispensable for a precise understanding of physiological changes and responses, including those of ripening processes and wounding stress, in fruit, but such information is still limited. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of metabolites within tissue sections of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI) technique combined with a matrix sublimation/recrystallization method. This technique elucidated the unique distribution patterns of more than 30 metabolite-derived ions, including primary and secondary metabolites, simultaneously. To investigate spatiotemporal metabolic alterations during physiological changes at the whole-tissue level, MALDI–MSI was performed using the different ripening phenotypes of mature green and mature red tomato fruits. Although apparent alterations in the localization and intensity of many detected metabolites were not observed between the two tomatoes, the amounts of glutamate and adenosine monophosphate, umami compounds, increased in both mesocarp and locule regions during the ripening process. In contrast, malate, a sour compound, decreased in both regions. MALDI–MSI was also applied to evaluate more local metabolic responses to wounding stress. Accumulations of a glycoalkaloid, tomatine, and a low level of its glycosylated metabolite, esculeoside A, were found in the wound region where cell death had been induced. Their inverse levels were observed in non-wounded regions. Furthermore, the amounts of both compounds differed in the developmental stages. Thus, our MALDI–MSI technique increased the understanding of the physiological changes and responses of tomato fruit through the determination of spatiotemporally resolved metabolic alterations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]",
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T1 - Spatially resolved metabolic distribution for unraveling the physiological change and responses in tomato fruit using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI)

AU - Nakamura, Junya

AU - Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi

AU - Fujimura, Yoshinori

AU - Hayakawa, Eisuke

AU - Takahashi, Katsutoshi

AU - Ishii, Takanori

AU - Miura, Daisuke

AU - Wariishi, Hiroyuki

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N2 - Information on spatiotemporal metabolic behavior is indispensable for a precise understanding of physiological changes and responses, including those of ripening processes and wounding stress, in fruit, but such information is still limited. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of metabolites within tissue sections of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI) technique combined with a matrix sublimation/recrystallization method. This technique elucidated the unique distribution patterns of more than 30 metabolite-derived ions, including primary and secondary metabolites, simultaneously. To investigate spatiotemporal metabolic alterations during physiological changes at the whole-tissue level, MALDI–MSI was performed using the different ripening phenotypes of mature green and mature red tomato fruits. Although apparent alterations in the localization and intensity of many detected metabolites were not observed between the two tomatoes, the amounts of glutamate and adenosine monophosphate, umami compounds, increased in both mesocarp and locule regions during the ripening process. In contrast, malate, a sour compound, decreased in both regions. MALDI–MSI was also applied to evaluate more local metabolic responses to wounding stress. Accumulations of a glycoalkaloid, tomatine, and a low level of its glycosylated metabolite, esculeoside A, were found in the wound region where cell death had been induced. Their inverse levels were observed in non-wounded regions. Furthermore, the amounts of both compounds differed in the developmental stages. Thus, our MALDI–MSI technique increased the understanding of the physiological changes and responses of tomato fruit through the determination of spatiotemporally resolved metabolic alterations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

AB - Information on spatiotemporal metabolic behavior is indispensable for a precise understanding of physiological changes and responses, including those of ripening processes and wounding stress, in fruit, but such information is still limited. Here, we visualized the spatial distribution of metabolites within tissue sections of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) fruit using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization–mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI–MSI) technique combined with a matrix sublimation/recrystallization method. This technique elucidated the unique distribution patterns of more than 30 metabolite-derived ions, including primary and secondary metabolites, simultaneously. To investigate spatiotemporal metabolic alterations during physiological changes at the whole-tissue level, MALDI–MSI was performed using the different ripening phenotypes of mature green and mature red tomato fruits. Although apparent alterations in the localization and intensity of many detected metabolites were not observed between the two tomatoes, the amounts of glutamate and adenosine monophosphate, umami compounds, increased in both mesocarp and locule regions during the ripening process. In contrast, malate, a sour compound, decreased in both regions. MALDI–MSI was also applied to evaluate more local metabolic responses to wounding stress. Accumulations of a glycoalkaloid, tomatine, and a low level of its glycosylated metabolite, esculeoside A, were found in the wound region where cell death had been induced. Their inverse levels were observed in non-wounded regions. Furthermore, the amounts of both compounds differed in the developmental stages. Thus, our MALDI–MSI technique increased the understanding of the physiological changes and responses of tomato fruit through the determination of spatiotemporally resolved metabolic alterations. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

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JO - Fresenius Zeitschrift fur Analytische Chemie

JF - Fresenius Zeitschrift fur Analytische Chemie

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