The derivation of predictive equations to speculate the post-mortem interval using cases with over 20-mL pleural effusion: A preliminary study

Yosuke Usumoto, Keiko Kudo, Akiko Tsuji, Yoko Ihama, Noriaki Ikeda

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

抄録

Often, pleural effusion is noted at autopsy when the cause of death is drowning or diseases such as heart, renal and liver failure. Several studies have established a correlation between the concentrations of electrolytes in pleural effusion and the post-mortem interval (PMI) or those concentrations and drowning site. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between the amount of pleural effusion, concentrations of electrolytes and total protein in pleural effusion, by integrated interpretation using various factors such as the deceased's gender, age, cause of death, drowning site, PMI and body temperature. We included 40 cadavers (26 male, 14 female) with >20-mL pleural effusion, which were categorised into four groups as follows: freshwater drowning; brackish water drowning; seawater drowning (drowning group); and not drowning. An equation derived to assess the lung weight revealed that the drowning site affected the lung weight. An equation for the amount of pleural effusion in the drowning group for the first time revealed that the amount of pleural effusion was directly proportional to the PMI. Using an equation to assess the PMI, we could estimate the PMI within 13.0–13.2 h in cases with >20-mL pleural effusion. Despite a small number of cases in the present study, we attained exciting results from the integrated statistical analysis.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)61-67
ページ数7
ジャーナルJournal of Forensic and Legal Medicine
65
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 7 1 2019

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Pleural Effusion
cause of death
Group
statistical analysis
Disease
water
interpretation
gender
Electrolytes
Cause of Death
Weights and Measures
Lung
Liver Failure
Seawater
Body Temperature
Fresh Water
Cadaver
Renal Insufficiency
Autopsy
Heart Failure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

これを引用

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AU - Ihama, Yoko

AU - Ikeda, Noriaki

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