The dominant role of proofreading exonuclease activity of replicative polymerase ε in cellular tolerance to cytarabine (Ara-C)

Masataka Tsuda, Kazuhiro Terada, Masato Ooka, Koji Kobayashi, Hiroyuki Sasanuma, Ryo Fujisawa, Toshiki Tsurimoto, Junpei Yamamoto, Shigenori Iwai, Kei Kadoda, Remi Akagawa, Shar Yin Naomi Huang, Yves Pommier, Julian E. Sale, Shunichi Takeda, Kouji Hirota

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

6 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs, such as Ara-C, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Trifluridine (FTD), are frequently incorporated into DNA by the replicative DNA polymerases. However, it remains unclear how this incorporation kills cycling cells. There are two possibilities: Nucleoside analog triphosphates inhibit the replicative DNA polymerases, and/or nucleotide analogs mis-incorporated into genomic DNA interfere with the next round of DNA synthesis as replicative DNA polymerases recognize them as template DNA lesions, arresting synthesis. To address the first possibility, we selectively disrupted the proofreading exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase ε (Polε), the leading-strand replicative polymerase in avian DT40 and human TK6 cell lines. To address the second, we disrupted RAD18, a gene involved in translesion DNA synthesis, a mechanism that relieves stalled replication. Strikingly, POLE1 exo-/- cells, but not RAD18 -/- cells, were hypersensitive to Ara-C, while RAD18 -/- cells were hypersensitive to FTD. γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of Ara-C was immediate and did not progress into the next round of replication, while γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of 5-FU and FTD was delayed to the next round of replication. Biochemical studies indicate that human proofreading-deficient Pole-exoholoenzyme incorporates Ara-CTP, but subsequently extend from this base several times less efficiently than from intact nucleotides. Together our results suggest that Ara-C acts by blocking extension of the nascent DNA strand and is counteracted by the proofreading activity of Pole, while 5-FU and FTD are efficiently incorporated but act as replication fork blocks in the subsequent S phase, which is counteracted by translesion synthesis.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)33457-33474
ページ数18
ジャーナルOncotarget
8
発行部数20
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2017

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Exonucleases
Cytarabine
Trifluridine
Fluorouracil
DNA-Directed DNA Polymerase
DNA
Nucleosides
Arabinofuranosylcytosine Triphosphate
Nucleotides
S Phase
Cell Line
Genes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

これを引用

Tsuda, M., Terada, K., Ooka, M., Kobayashi, K., Sasanuma, H., Fujisawa, R., ... Hirota, K. (2017). The dominant role of proofreading exonuclease activity of replicative polymerase ε in cellular tolerance to cytarabine (Ara-C). Oncotarget, 8(20), 33457-33474. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16508

The dominant role of proofreading exonuclease activity of replicative polymerase ε in cellular tolerance to cytarabine (Ara-C). / Tsuda, Masataka; Terada, Kazuhiro; Ooka, Masato; Kobayashi, Koji; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Ryo; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Kadoda, Kei; Akagawa, Remi; Huang, Shar Yin Naomi; Pommier, Yves; Sale, Julian E.; Takeda, Shunichi; Hirota, Kouji.

:: Oncotarget, 巻 8, 番号 20, 01.01.2017, p. 33457-33474.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Tsuda, M, Terada, K, Ooka, M, Kobayashi, K, Sasanuma, H, Fujisawa, R, Tsurimoto, T, Yamamoto, J, Iwai, S, Kadoda, K, Akagawa, R, Huang, SYN, Pommier, Y, Sale, JE, Takeda, S & Hirota, K 2017, 'The dominant role of proofreading exonuclease activity of replicative polymerase ε in cellular tolerance to cytarabine (Ara-C)' Oncotarget, 巻. 8, 番号 20, pp. 33457-33474. https://doi.org/10.18632/oncotarget.16508
Tsuda, Masataka ; Terada, Kazuhiro ; Ooka, Masato ; Kobayashi, Koji ; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki ; Fujisawa, Ryo ; Tsurimoto, Toshiki ; Yamamoto, Junpei ; Iwai, Shigenori ; Kadoda, Kei ; Akagawa, Remi ; Huang, Shar Yin Naomi ; Pommier, Yves ; Sale, Julian E. ; Takeda, Shunichi ; Hirota, Kouji. / The dominant role of proofreading exonuclease activity of replicative polymerase ε in cellular tolerance to cytarabine (Ara-C). :: Oncotarget. 2017 ; 巻 8, 番号 20. pp. 33457-33474.
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abstract = "Chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs, such as Ara-C, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Trifluridine (FTD), are frequently incorporated into DNA by the replicative DNA polymerases. However, it remains unclear how this incorporation kills cycling cells. There are two possibilities: Nucleoside analog triphosphates inhibit the replicative DNA polymerases, and/or nucleotide analogs mis-incorporated into genomic DNA interfere with the next round of DNA synthesis as replicative DNA polymerases recognize them as template DNA lesions, arresting synthesis. To address the first possibility, we selectively disrupted the proofreading exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase ε (Polε), the leading-strand replicative polymerase in avian DT40 and human TK6 cell lines. To address the second, we disrupted RAD18, a gene involved in translesion DNA synthesis, a mechanism that relieves stalled replication. Strikingly, POLE1 exo-/- cells, but not RAD18 -/- cells, were hypersensitive to Ara-C, while RAD18 -/- cells were hypersensitive to FTD. γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of Ara-C was immediate and did not progress into the next round of replication, while γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of 5-FU and FTD was delayed to the next round of replication. Biochemical studies indicate that human proofreading-deficient Pole-exoholoenzyme incorporates Ara-CTP, but subsequently extend from this base several times less efficiently than from intact nucleotides. Together our results suggest that Ara-C acts by blocking extension of the nascent DNA strand and is counteracted by the proofreading activity of Pole, while 5-FU and FTD are efficiently incorporated but act as replication fork blocks in the subsequent S phase, which is counteracted by translesion synthesis.",
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AU - Kobayashi, Koji

AU - Sasanuma, Hiroyuki

AU - Fujisawa, Ryo

AU - Tsurimoto, Toshiki

AU - Yamamoto, Junpei

AU - Iwai, Shigenori

AU - Kadoda, Kei

AU - Akagawa, Remi

AU - Huang, Shar Yin Naomi

AU - Pommier, Yves

AU - Sale, Julian E.

AU - Takeda, Shunichi

AU - Hirota, Kouji

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N2 - Chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs, such as Ara-C, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Trifluridine (FTD), are frequently incorporated into DNA by the replicative DNA polymerases. However, it remains unclear how this incorporation kills cycling cells. There are two possibilities: Nucleoside analog triphosphates inhibit the replicative DNA polymerases, and/or nucleotide analogs mis-incorporated into genomic DNA interfere with the next round of DNA synthesis as replicative DNA polymerases recognize them as template DNA lesions, arresting synthesis. To address the first possibility, we selectively disrupted the proofreading exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase ε (Polε), the leading-strand replicative polymerase in avian DT40 and human TK6 cell lines. To address the second, we disrupted RAD18, a gene involved in translesion DNA synthesis, a mechanism that relieves stalled replication. Strikingly, POLE1 exo-/- cells, but not RAD18 -/- cells, were hypersensitive to Ara-C, while RAD18 -/- cells were hypersensitive to FTD. γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of Ara-C was immediate and did not progress into the next round of replication, while γH2AX focus formation following a pulse of 5-FU and FTD was delayed to the next round of replication. Biochemical studies indicate that human proofreading-deficient Pole-exoholoenzyme incorporates Ara-CTP, but subsequently extend from this base several times less efficiently than from intact nucleotides. Together our results suggest that Ara-C acts by blocking extension of the nascent DNA strand and is counteracted by the proofreading activity of Pole, while 5-FU and FTD are efficiently incorporated but act as replication fork blocks in the subsequent S phase, which is counteracted by translesion synthesis.

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