The ORC1 cycle in human cells: I. Cell cycle-regulated oscillation of human ORC1

Yasutoshi Tatsumi, Satoshi Ohta, Hiroshi Kimura, Toshiki Tsurimoto, Chikashi Obuse

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

73 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Components of ORC (the origin recognition complex) are highly conserved among eukaryotes and are thought to play an essential role in the initiation of DNA replication. The level of the largest subunit of human ORC (ORC1) during the cell cycle was studied in several human cell lines with a specific antibody. In all cell lines, ORC1 levels oscillate: ORC1 starts to accumulate in mid-G1 phase, reaches a peak at the G1/S boundary, and decreases to a basal level in S phase. In contrast, the levels of other ORC subunits (ORCs 2-5) remain constant throughout the cell cycle. The oscillation of ORC1, or the ORC1 cycle, also occurs in cells expressing ORC1 ectopically from a constitutive promoter. Furthermore, the 26 S proteasome inhibitor MG132 blocks the decrease in ORC1, suggesting that the ORC1 cycle is mainly due to 26 S proteasome-dependent degradation. Arrest of the cell cycle in early S phase by hydroxyurea, aphidicolin, or thymidine treatment is associated with basal levels of ORC1, indicating that ORC1 proteolysis starts in early S phase and is independent of S phase progression. These observations indicate that the ORC1 cycle in human cells is highly linked with cell cycle progression, allowing the initiation of replication to be coordinated with the cell cycle and preventing origins from refiring.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)41528-41534
ページ数7
ジャーナルJournal of Biological Chemistry
278
発行部数42
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 10 17 2003

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Origin Recognition Complex
S Phase
Cell Cycle
Cells
Aphidicolin
Cell Line
Proteasome Inhibitors
Hydroxyurea
G1 Phase
Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex
Cell Cycle Checkpoints
Eukaryota
DNA Replication
Thymidine
Proteolysis
Antibodies
Degradation
DNA

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

これを引用

The ORC1 cycle in human cells : I. Cell cycle-regulated oscillation of human ORC1. / Tatsumi, Yasutoshi; Ohta, Satoshi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Obuse, Chikashi.

:: Journal of Biological Chemistry, 巻 278, 番号 42, 17.10.2003, p. 41528-41534.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

Tatsumi, Yasutoshi ; Ohta, Satoshi ; Kimura, Hiroshi ; Tsurimoto, Toshiki ; Obuse, Chikashi. / The ORC1 cycle in human cells : I. Cell cycle-regulated oscillation of human ORC1. :: Journal of Biological Chemistry. 2003 ; 巻 278, 番号 42. pp. 41528-41534.
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