Transmission electron microtomography in soft materials

Hiroshi Jinnai, Toshihiko Tsuchiya, Sohei Motoki, Takeshi Kaneko, Takeshi Higuchi, Atsushi Takahara

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

21 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

This review summarizes the recent advances in three-dimensional (3D) imaging techniques and their application to polymer nanostructures, for example, microphase-separated structures of block copolymers. We place particular emphasis on the method of transmission electron microtomography (electron tomography for short; hereafter abbreviated as ET). As a result of recent developments in ET, truly quantitative 3D images of polymer nanostructures can now be obtained with subnanometer resolution. The introduction of scanning optics in ET has made it possible to obtain large amounts of 3D data from micrometer-thick polymer specimens by using conventional electron microscopes at a relatively low accelerating voltage, 200 kV. Thus, ET covers structures over a wide range of thicknesses, from a few nanometers to several hundred nanometers, which corresponds to quite an important spatial range for hierarchical polymer nanostructures. ET provides clear 3D images and a wide range of new structural information that cannot be obtained using other methods. Information traditionally derived from conventional microscopy or scattering methods can be directly acquired from 3D volume data. ET is a versatile technique that is not restricted to only polymer applications; it can also be used as a powerful characterization tool in energy applications such as fuel cells.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)243-258
ページ数16
ジャーナルJournal of Electron Microscopy
62
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 1 2013

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Electron Microscope Tomography
Polymers
Nanostructures
Electrons
polymers
electrons
Three-Dimensional Imaging
Optical resolving power
block copolymers
imaging techniques
Block copolymers
fuel cells
Tomography
micrometers
Fuel cells
Microscopy
Optics
Microscopic examination
Electron microscopes
tomography

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Instrumentation

これを引用

Transmission electron microtomography in soft materials. / Jinnai, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Toshihiko; Motoki, Sohei; Kaneko, Takeshi; Higuchi, Takeshi; Takahara, Atsushi.

:: Journal of Electron Microscopy, 巻 62, 番号 2, 01.04.2013, p. 243-258.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿評論記事

Jinnai, H, Tsuchiya, T, Motoki, S, Kaneko, T, Higuchi, T & Takahara, A 2013, 'Transmission electron microtomography in soft materials', Journal of Electron Microscopy, 巻. 62, 番号 2, pp. 243-258. https://doi.org/10.1093/jmicro/dfs070
Jinnai, Hiroshi ; Tsuchiya, Toshihiko ; Motoki, Sohei ; Kaneko, Takeshi ; Higuchi, Takeshi ; Takahara, Atsushi. / Transmission electron microtomography in soft materials. :: Journal of Electron Microscopy. 2013 ; 巻 62, 番号 2. pp. 243-258.
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