Use of a simple arm-raising test with a portable laser Doppler blood flow meter to detect dehydration

Hirofumi Nogami, W. Iwasaki, T. Abe, Y. Kimura, A. Onoe, E. Higurashi, S. Takeuchi, Makiko Nakahara, Masutaka Furue, Renshi Sawada

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

8 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Using micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) technologies, the authors have developed the world's smallest, lightest, and least power-consuming laser Doppler blood flow meter. Unlike commercial fibre-type blood flow instruments, the new blood flow meter is invulnerable to any movements of the person wearing it and has a wireless transmitter. Utilizing the characteristics of the blood flow meter, the authors attempted to detect dehydration by having a subject simply raise an arm (arm-raising test) with the flow meter attached to a fingertip. Healthy young volunteers (20 men and two women, mean age 22.9, age range 21-27 years) were instructed to perspire in a sauna until they became dehydrated. The target dewatering ratio was 2 per cent, which was calculated from the body weight measured using a weight scale. Four markers were compared: mean blood flow (MBF) before arm-raising, MBF during arm-raising, maximum amplitude (MA) of the pulse wave during arm-raising, and inclination of reflex (IR) wave calculated from the recorded blood flow data for the non-dehydrated (before sauna) and dehydrated (3h after sauna) states in the arm-raising test. Each of the mean total markers (MBF during arm-raising, MA, and IR) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) during the dehydrated state than the non-dehydrated. These results suggest that three markers could detect dehydration and the blood flow meter devised has the potential to be used as a portable device for detecting dehydration.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)411-419
ページ数9
ジャーナルProceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine
225
発行部数4
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 4 1 2011

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Dehydration
Blood
Lasers
Dewatering
MEMS
Transmitters
Fibers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Mechanical Engineering

これを引用

Use of a simple arm-raising test with a portable laser Doppler blood flow meter to detect dehydration. / Nogami, Hirofumi; Iwasaki, W.; Abe, T.; Kimura, Y.; Onoe, A.; Higurashi, E.; Takeuchi, S.; Nakahara, Makiko; Furue, Masutaka; Sawada, Renshi.

:: Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part H: Journal of Engineering in Medicine, 巻 225, 番号 4, 01.04.2011, p. 411-419.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

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