Using breakup models and propagators to devise debris search strategies in GEO

Toshiya Hanada, Mark Matney

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿Conference article

4 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

Current search strategies for telescopes observing the GEO environment are designed around the known orbital distributions of catalogued objects. However, the majority of catalogued objects are believed to be intact spacecraft and rocket bodies - not the debris particles the searches are intended to locate. If there have been breakups in GEO, the explosions may have put the debris into orbits that are significantly different from those in the catalogue. Consequently, observation plans optimized for the catalogue population may not be optimized for any unseen debris populations. We will present some hypothetical cases, including a near-synchronous US Titan IIIC Transtage explosion, to demonstrate this effect and make some observations on how to implement future search strategies.

元の言語英語
ページ(範囲)373-383
ページ数11
ジャーナルAdvances in the Astronautical Sciences
110
出版物ステータス出版済み - 1 1 2002
イベントProceedings of the 9th International Space Conference of Pacific Basin Societies (ISCOPS, formerly PISSTA) - Pasadena, CA, 米国
継続期間: 11 14 200111 16 2001

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Debris
explosion
Explosions
Titan
spacecraft
Rockets
Telescopes
Spacecraft
Orbits
particle
effect
plan
distribution

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

これを引用

Using breakup models and propagators to devise debris search strategies in GEO. / Hanada, Toshiya; Matney, Mark.

:: Advances in the Astronautical Sciences, 巻 110, 01.01.2002, p. 373-383.

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿Conference article

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