Zeta potential estimation of volcanic rocks on 11 island arc-type volcanoes in Japan: Implication for the generation of local self-potential anomalies

Koki Aizawa, Makoto Uyeshima, Kenji Nogami

研究成果: ジャーナルへの寄稿記事

17 引用 (Scopus)

抄録

From streaming potential measurements, we deduced the zeta potential of 73 volcanic rock samples collected in 11 volcanoes where self-potential (SP) surveys had also been conducted. Experiments with crushed rock samples and 0.001 mol/L NaCl solution showed a large variation in streaming potential coefficient, which ranged from -2860 to 2280 mV/MPa (deduced zeta potential ranged from -45.1 to 37.2 mV). Among the 73 samples, 9 samples showed positive values, and 11 samples showed small absolute values less than 10 mV. Even in a volcano, the zeta potential values of rocks were sometimes highly variable. To investigate the reason for the variation in zeta potential, we performed X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements on the rock samples. However, no significant correlations between zeta potential (or isoelectric point) and weight percentage of major elements were found, implying that the zeta potential of the volcanic rocks is not controlled by chemical composition but by mineralogical composition or crystalline structure. In volcanic areas, rocks with positive or small absolute values of zeta potential, which are considered to be unusual, frequently exist in areas along with local positive SP anomalies. Although positive SP anomalies are usually interpreted as an indication of hydrothermal upflow, this correlation suggests that in addition to the groundwater flow pattern, the polarity of zeta potential should also be considered for interpretation of SP data. Therefore, in cases where detailed zeta potential measurements have not been conducted, local positive SP anomalies should be interpreted with caution.

元の言語英語
記事番号B02201
ジャーナルJournal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth
113
発行部数2
DOI
出版物ステータス出版済み - 2 4 2008
外部発表Yes

Fingerprint

Volcanic rocks
self potential
Volcanoes
island arcs
Zeta potential
volcanoes
island arc
volcanology
Japan
volcanic rock
volcano
rocks
anomalies
anomaly
streaming potential
rock
Rocks
X-ray fluorescence
flow pattern
groundwater flow

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Oceanography

これを引用

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abstract = "From streaming potential measurements, we deduced the zeta potential of 73 volcanic rock samples collected in 11 volcanoes where self-potential (SP) surveys had also been conducted. Experiments with crushed rock samples and 0.001 mol/L NaCl solution showed a large variation in streaming potential coefficient, which ranged from -2860 to 2280 mV/MPa (deduced zeta potential ranged from -45.1 to 37.2 mV). Among the 73 samples, 9 samples showed positive values, and 11 samples showed small absolute values less than 10 mV. Even in a volcano, the zeta potential values of rocks were sometimes highly variable. To investigate the reason for the variation in zeta potential, we performed X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements on the rock samples. However, no significant correlations between zeta potential (or isoelectric point) and weight percentage of major elements were found, implying that the zeta potential of the volcanic rocks is not controlled by chemical composition but by mineralogical composition or crystalline structure. In volcanic areas, rocks with positive or small absolute values of zeta potential, which are considered to be unusual, frequently exist in areas along with local positive SP anomalies. Although positive SP anomalies are usually interpreted as an indication of hydrothermal upflow, this correlation suggests that in addition to the groundwater flow pattern, the polarity of zeta potential should also be considered for interpretation of SP data. Therefore, in cases where detailed zeta potential measurements have not been conducted, local positive SP anomalies should be interpreted with caution.",
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